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Vienna School Number 1 (Vienna Center)

Vienna School Number 1, or the Vienna Center School, was established in the fall of 1806, the same year in which Vienna Township was officially organized and recognized by the Trumbull County Commissioners. The school was a sub-district of the Vienna Township Rural School District.

The school building, measuring 20 feet by 26 feet, stood on the northeast corner of Vienna Center. Perhaps this is the building the Connecticut missionary Reverend Thomas Robbins mentioned in his diary. He wrote on March 19, 1805: "The people here [in Vienna] are calculating to build a good framed school-house to use for meetings."[1] This schoolhouse served the entire township until about 1840. By that time, eight new one-room schoolhouses were being erected around the Township. Three more one-room school buildings were constructed to accommodate the needs of neighboring townships. These schools were called joint district schools and the residents of both townships shared the costs.

When these schools and the Vienna Academy were opened, the old Number 1 School at Vienna Center was removed. Sometime in the mid nineteenth century the Temperance House (later called Hull House) was built in its place. This left Vienna Village (the term used for Vienna Center) without a schoolhouse. For those students living in Vienna Village, the nearest school was either Vienna School Number 7 at Murray's Corners, about two miles west, or Vienna School Number 8, about one and a half miles north. By 1872, a two-story school was erected between the Methodist Church and the Presbyterian Church on Vienna Township Green. This building now houses (2014) the Copper Penny Masonic Lodge.

Teachers and Administrators

Andrew Bushnell, of Hartford Township, served first as the schoolmaster in this building, followed by James Julius Humason of Vienna.


This article is adapted from Fred L. Martin and Genie Ulp, "Vienna Township Schools, Then and Now," in Vienna, Ohio, "Where We Live and Let Live": Town 4, Range 2, of the Connecticut Western Reserve (Apollo, PA: Closson Press, 1999), pp. 161-163.

[1] Thomas R. Robbins, Diary of Thomas Robbins, D.D., 1796-1854. Printed for his Nephew. Owned by the Connecticut Historical Society, In Two Volumes, ed. Increase N. Tarbox (Boston, 1886), Volume 1, page 252.