Baldwin, Jesse

Farmer, War of 1812 Veteran
Birth: September 16, 1781, Branford, New Haven County, Connecticut
Death: June 28, 1850, Fowler, Trumbull County, Ohio
Burial: Vienna Township Cemetery

Military Service: Howe's Regiment or Sanford's Regiment, Connecticut Militia

Jesse Baldwin and his wife Phebe Pardee (born circa 1775 and died sometime between December 23-31, 1857) settled in Vienna Township sometime between the end of the War of 1812 and 1820. Their names appear on the Federal Census of 1820. They had married on July 2, 1799, in Southington, Hartford County, Connecticut, and were living in Simsbury, Connecticut, by 1810, according to the Federal Census.

The Baldwin family included five children in the 1820 Census. The two eldest children are not included in this enumeration, though they appear in the 1830 Census.

Published Biography
From Harriet Taylor Upton, A Twentieth Century History of Trumbull County, Ohio: A Narrative Account of Its Historical Progress, Its People, and Its Principal Interests (Chicago: Lewis Publishing Company, 1909), Volume 1, pp. 595-596:

Jesse Baldwin, with his wife, Phebe Pardee, and ten children, came to Vernon [Vienna] in 1815 from their home in West Avon, Connecticut. Their journey was like all the rest, and their hardships were the same after they reached their new home. Mrs. Baldwin (Phebe Pardee) was a cripple from childhood and as little was known about surgery at that time, or about mechanical apparatus for assisting lame people, she went about all her life with the aid of a chair. Nancy, the oldest daughter, married Allen Sutliff, a brother of Judge Milton Sutliff, late of Warren. Phebe, another daughter, married Alanson Smith of Fowler. Nelson, who was one and one-half years old when his parents came, lived in Vienna. He married Maria Scoville. The old Baldwin homestead in Vienna, located one and one-half miles west of Vienna Center, is now owned and occupied by William Munson.

Mr. Baldwin was a tanner, and Mrs. Baldwin, despite her affliction, made the clothing winter and summer, for the family, and she was a marvelous needlewoman. She lived with her son Nelson, in the old home until she was eighty-one years old. It is said that the old home in the early days of the Baldwins was a social place, and that they were all exceedingly honest and straight-forward in their dealings.