Garrard, Charles Thomas

Civil War Veteran
Birth: 1842
Death: Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, 1925
Burial:

Military Service: Private, 7th Regiment, Company H, Ohio Infantry; Quartermaster Sergeant, 6th U.S. Cavalry

Charles Thomas Garrard was living in Bazetta when the Civil War began. According to a letter by Captain J. H. Asper, Company H, 7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, printed on the front page of the Western Reserve Chronicle on New Year's Day, 1862, Garrard had recently joined the unit.[1] He re-enlisted at age 19 on October 23, 1862, and was described in the registration roll as a six-feet-tall, brown-eyed, black-haired, 19-year-old man. His brother Daniel Warren Garrard also served in the conflict.

After his military service Charles moved to Cleveland and then to Chicago, where he died in 1925.

Regimental History, 7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry
Organized at Camp Dennison, Ohio, June 16, 1861. Left State for Clarksburg, W. Va., June 26, 1861, arriving there June 29. Attached to Railroad District, West Virginia, to January, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Landers' Division, Army Potomac, to March, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Shields' 2nd Division, Banks' 5th Army Corps, and Dept. of the Shenandoah, to May, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Shields' Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 2nd Corps, Pope's Army of Virginia, to August, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 12th Army Corps, Army Potomac, to October, 1863, and Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to June, 1864.

SERVICE.-Expedition to Weston, W. Va., June 29-30. Relief of Glenville July 5. Advance to Sutton and Cross Lanes July 7-August 15. Moved to Gauley Bridge August 21-22. Cross Lanes, near Summerville, August 26. At Charleston till November. Operations in the Kanawha Valley October 19-November 16. Expedition to Loop Creek and Fayettevllle November 1-15. McCoy's Mills November 15. Expedition to Blue's Gap January 6-7, 1862. Blue's Gap January 7. Duty at Hampton Heights and Paw Paw Tunnel till March 7. Advance on Winchester March 7-15. Reconnoissance to Strasburg March 18-21. Battle of Winchester March 22-23. Monterey April 12. March to Fredericksburg May 12-21, and return to Front Royal May 25-30. Battle of Port Republic June 9. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Guard trains during battles of Bull Run August 28-30. Maryland Campaign September 6-22. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Moved to Harper's Ferry, W. Va., and duty at Bolivar Heights till December. Reconnoissance to Rippon, W. Va., November 8. Reconnoissance to Charleston December 1-6. Berryville December 1. March to Stafford Court House December 10-14, and duty there till January 20, 1863. Dumfries December 29. "Mud March" January 20-24. At Stafford Court House till April 27. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June 11-July 24. Battle of Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3. Pursuit of Lee to Manassas Gap, Va., July 5-24. Duty at New York during draft disturbances August 29-September 8. Movement to Bridgeport, Ala., September 24-October 3. Garrison's Creek, near Fosterville, October 6 (Detachment). Reopening Tennessee River October 26-29. Chattanooga-Ringgold Campaign November 23-27. Lookout Mountain November 23-24. Mission Ridge November 25. Ringgold Gap, Taylor's Ridge, November 27. At Bridgeport, Ala., till May. Atlanta (Ga.) Campaign May 1-June 11. Demonstration on Rocky Faced Ridge May 8-11. Dug Gap, or Mill Creek, May 8. Battle of Resaca May 14-15. Near Cassville May 19. New Hope Church May 25. Operations on line of Pumpkin Vine Creek and battles about Dallas, New Hope Church and Allatoona Hills May 26-June 5. Left front for muster out June 11. Veterans and Recruits transferred to 5th Ohio Infantry. Mustered out July 6, 1864, expiration of term.

Regiment lost during service 10 Officers and 174 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 87 Enlisted men by disease. Total 273.


[1] The letter, dated December 18, 1861, is reproduced digitally at the Library of Congress' Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers project: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84028385/1862-01-01/ed-1/seq-1/